Course Descriptions

While many students have a notion that honors courses are, by default, harder, we always say that honors classes are different. With an average class size of just 17 students, honors classes allow students to have far more interaction with their professors and fellow students; in turn, this allows professors to design their classes to revolve around discussion and active learning rather than lectures and tests.

The Honors College offers two types of honors courses that are available to all honors students. Liberal Studies honors sections (LBST-H), which also fulfill general education requirements, and honors topics seminars (HONR 3700), upper-level discussion-intensive courses.

Please note, you must be enrolled in the University Honors Program, Business Honors Program, Levine Scholars Program, Crown Scholars Program, Martin Scholars Program, Art + Architecture Honors Program or have permission of the Honors College.  To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey (Office Administrator) at shannonzurell@uncc.edu.  

The following Honors College courses will be offered for the Fall 2020 semester: 

LBST 1101 – H71 (CRN#13474)            

Arts & Society: Dance (HONR)

Sarkar, Kaustavi                                        

Tuesday and Thursday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm

“Diaspora and Identity through Dance in South Asia” – In this course, students will focus on dance as cultural mobility and identity. Deepening their understanding on the diaspora, its formation, sustenance, and proliferation, this course will allow students to appreciate the role of performance in cultural formation. Diasporic artists often create a sense of nostalgic belonging to their home countries. Focusing on South Asian artists who work in the urban diaspora of Charlotte, students will learn historical, geographical, and cultural precepts of how identity and performance are integrally connected.

LBST 1103 – H72 (CRN#16917)             

Arts & Society:  Music (HONOR)

Tucker, Lindsey                                      

Monday and Wednesday 4:00 pm – 5:15 pm

"Inquiry into the Musical Arts" - In this course, we will conduct an individual and group inquiry into the musical arts. We will attend a range of musical performances, both on and off campus, aiming to experience and investigate a range of artistic expression from the classical to the experimental, and from a variety of cultural perspectives. Assignments will require attendance in the classroom and at events, research, reflection, and discussion. Our events will likely not coincide with class time, so attendance of certain class days/times will be forgiven throughout the semester, all of which will be on the course calendar the first day of class.

LBST 1105 – H73 (CRN#16657)             

Arts & Society:  Visual Arts (HONR)

Hso, Frances                                            

Tuesday and Thursday 2:30 – 3:45

This seminar will interrogate the way memories and histories of people of color are interpreted and represented in museums and memorials the United States. While the focus will primarily be on African American histories and identities, the seminar will also explore the experiences and commemorations associated with Native Americans, immigrants, and other racial minorities. Questions of form, inscription, timing, site, narrative, and reception will be analyzed for a variety of memorials and museums.

LBST 2101 – H74 (CRN#14769)             

Western History & Culture (HONR)    

Caro, Lennin                                                

Monday and Wednesday 4:00 pm – 5:15 pm

“The Self in Cross-Cultural Perspectives” - This course focuses on the idea of the self/individual and its historical development in Western discourse. Students will read excerpts of important works by significant thinkers like Plato, Descartes, Freud, Marx, and Foucault. While these works can be difficult to read and understand, it gives students the opportunity to engage with each other and create a community of readers in which lively discussions can take place. Throughout the course, we will compare and contrast these various ideas of the self not only to other Western scholars, but to other non-Western cultures as well. The purpose of this is to introduce students to new concepts of selfhood that challenges existing ones in our current discourse.

LBST 2102 – H04 (CRN#17276)              

Honors College Topics:  LibertéÉgalité, Fraternité, and Négritude:  The Historical Realities of the Afro-Francophone Community

Jean-Louis, Felix                                       

Monday and Wednesday 2:30 – 3:45

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to explore the experiences of people of African descent in the Francophone landscape from the Caribbean plantation through the colonization of the African Continent and in the French mainland. Students will learn how people of African descent became part of the French cultural landscape; they will explore the efforts of the enslaved to gain their freedom within the framework of the French Revolution, how free people of color sought to incorporate themselves into the French colonial landscape. The course will explore French colonization of Africa, and explore how colonial subjects and those from the Antilles united and clashed in efforts to forge a united Afro-descended community during the interwar years. The class will then explore Negritude and decolonization, ending with a modern exploration of Afro-Francophonie in France, the Caribbean, and Africa.

LBST 2213 – H75 (CRN#11354)            

Science, Technology & Society (HONR) 

Webster, Murray                                      

Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm

The course will have three broad themes:  1) growth of science and the roles of government and universities in the 20th century; 2) sources and effects of anti-science movements; and 3) applying scientific knowledge to policy issues.  The goal is to help students develop an understanding of interrelations among institutions and knowledge structures, and to form a deeper appreciation for knowledge and viewpoints, and how they relate to social issues.  As a result of assignments and discussion, I hope that students will come to see the bigger picture of how knowledge develops and how social structures relate to that and how social structures are themselves affected by popular beliefs and values.

LBST 2301 – H76 (CRN#13808)             

Critical Thinking & Comm (HONR)

Honors Topic: Citizenship

Owens, Cache                                            

Tuesday 6:30 pm – 9:15 pm

A study of the concept of citizenship with an emphasis on scholarly understandings of the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Lectures, reading, and seminars explore the historical, ethical, and political foundations of voluntary service for issues such as poverty, homelessness, and social justice. Includes a service component that allows students to explore the relations of citizenship and public service. Students enrolled attend seminar meetings, complete 40 hours of service in the community, and create a reflective journal assignment and final portfolio. This course will be coordinated with the other honors section of LBST 2301.

LBST 2301 – H77 (CRN#13478)             

Critical Thinking & Comm (HONR)

Honors Topic: Citizenship

Howarth, Joe                                              

Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 am – 9:45 am

A study of the concept of citizenship with an emphasis on scholarly understandings of the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Lectures, reading, and seminars explore the historical, ethical, and political foundations of voluntary service for issues such as poverty, homelessness, and social justice. Includes a service component that allows students to explore the relations of citizenship and public service. Students enrolled attend seminar meetings, complete 40 hours of service in the community, and create a reflective journal assignment and final portfolio. This course will be coordinated with the other honors section of LBST 2301.

 

HONR 3700 – H01 (CRN#14266)          

Honors College Topics:  Critical Pedagogy and Multiculturalism in Urban Spaces

Wiggan, Greg                                             

Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 am – 12:45 pm

This honors seminar examines Critical Pedagogy and Multiculturalism in Urban Spaces to provide a framework for transformative pedagogical practices in schools and society. The primary purpose of this course is to provide needed social context and multicultural insights through service learning and experiential projects that promote critical pedagogy and understandings of urbanization. Given the American educational system’s marginalization of urban and minority learners and their communities, critical place-based pedagogy is crucial as an interdisciplinary and community engaging framework.

HONR 3700 – H02 (CRN#16864)          

Honors College Topics:  Churches and Temples as Neuro-Performance Spaces

Pizzato, Mark                                             

Tuesday and Thursday 4:00 pm – 5:15 pm

This course explores how the architecture, artworks, and performances in religious spaces reflect specific traditions, and the inner theatre of the visitor’s brain.

HONR 3700 – H03 (CRN#12766)           

Honors College Topics:  Critical Global Citizenship & the Subtainable Development Goals

Byker, Erik                                                   

Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 am – 11:15 am

The purpose of this course is to introduce and examine what it means to be a critical global citizen. The course will explore and compare global issues in relationship to the Sustainable Development Goals. In developing a framework for critical global citizenship, students will compare how these issues are similar and different in another country or context. One of the primary objectives of this course is to provide authentic learning experiences for inquiring, investigating, and reporting on how global issues compare. The course puts a high priority on doing as a pathway to critical thinking.

 

HONR 3700 – H04 (CRN#14819)              

Honors College Topics:  LibertéÉgalité, Fraternité, and Négritude:  The Historical Realities of the Afro-Francophone Community

Jean-Louis, Felix                                       

Monday and Wednesday 2:30 – 3:45

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to explore the experiences of people of African descent in the Francophone landscape from the Caribbean plantation through the colonization of the African Continent and in the French mainland. Students will learn how people of African descent became part of the French cultural landscape; they will explore the efforts of the enslaved to gain their freedom within the framework of the French Revolution, how free people of color sought to incorporate themselves into the French colonial landscape. The course will explore French colonization of Africa, and explore how colonial subjects and those from the Antilles united and clashed in efforts to forge a united Afro-descended community during the interwar years. The class will then explore Negritude and decolonization, ending with a modern exploration of Afro-Francophonie in France, the Caribbean, and Africa.

HONR 3700 – H05 (CRN#13745)          

Honors College Topics:  Leadership:  Theory and Practice

Adnot, Mindy                                             

Monday 2:30 pm – 5:15 pm

In this course, we will examine leadership theories from multiple disciplinary perspectives including psychology, management, political science and communication studies. How do conceptualizations of a “good leader” vary across fields? Students will be asked to develop an interdisciplinary framework for leadership by drawing together ideas from across disciplinary boundaries, and to put these ideas into practice as discussion leaders for the University Honors Program’s Colloquium course (HONR 1700). By engaging in a cycle of study, application, and reflection, students will develop their leadership identity and build their capacity for effectively facilitating discussion in a peer learning community.  Permission of the instructor (through application) is required.

ECON 2101 - H01 (CRN#11566)

Student Data Mart - Gen Ed (Economics)

Hawkins Amato, Louis                          

Thursday 10:00 am - 11:15 am

Scope and methodology of economics as a social science, the measurement of national income, the theory of national income determination, money and banking, monetary and fiscal policy, and international economics.

 

The following UHP courses will be offered for the Fall 2020 semester:   

HONR 1700 – H01 (CRN#13889)          

University Honors Program Colloquium

Lynch, Denise                                             

Thursday 4:00 pm – 5:15 pm

Must be enrolled in the University Honors Program.  This course introduces students to the University Honors Program and explores topics such as scholarship, community engagement, and leadership opportunities in the honors program, the university, and larger community.  Students will complete a series of writings and create an e-portfolio.  Students will also participate in occasional activities outside of class including our Venture program and City as Text event.

 

HONR 1700 – H02 (CRN#13888)         

University Honors Program Colloquium

Lynch, Denise                                             

Wednesday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm

Must be enrolled in the University Honors Program.  This course introduces students to the University Honors Program and explores topics such as scholarship, community engagement, and leadership opportunities in the honors program, the university, and larger community.  Students will complete a series of writings and create an e-portfolio.  Students will also participate in occasional activities outside of class including our Venture program and City as Text event.

HONR 1700 – H03 (CRN#13891)          

University Honors Program Colloquium

Lynch, Denise                                             

Friday 11:15 am – 12:30 pm

Must be enrolled in the University Honors Program.  This course introduces students to the University Honors Program and explores topics such as scholarship, community engagement, and leadership opportunities in the honors program, the university, and larger community.  Students will complete a series of writings and create an e-portfolio.  Students will also participate in occasional activities outside of class including our Venture program and City as Text event.

HONR 3790 – H01 (CRN#12347)          

University Honors Senior Seminar

Adnot, Mindy                                             

Wednesday 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm

Must be enrolled in the University Honors Program.  Prerequisites: Six hours of Honors coursework and permission of the University Honors Program.  Focuses on development of a proposal for the University Honors Program (UHP) senior electronic portfolio project in consultation with a UHP faculty committee selected by the student. Project proposals are submitted through the Application to Candidacy process for approval by the Honors College.  The course is offered only in the Fall semester for students planning to graduate the following Spring or Fall semester. 

ECON 2101 - H01 (CRN#11566)

Student Data Mart - Gen Ed (Economics)

Amato, Louis                          

Thursday 10:00 am - 11:15 am

Scope and methodology of economics as a social science, the measurement of national income, the theory of national income determination, money and banking, monetary and fiscal policy, and international economics.


LBST 2102 – H04 (CRN#17276)             

Global Connections (HONR)    

Jean-Louis, Felix                                               

Monday and Wednesday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm

"Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité, and Négritude:  The Historical Realities of the Afro-Francophone Community" Course will take an interdisciplinary approach to explore the experiences of people of African descent in the Francophone landscape from the Caribbean plantation through the colonization of the African Continent and in the French mainland. Students will learn how people of African descent became part of the French cultural landscape; they will explore the efforts of the enslaved to gain their freedom within the framework of the French Revolution, how free people of color sought to incorporate themselves into the French colonial landscape. The course will explore French colonization of Africa, and explore how colonial subjects and those from the Antilles united and clashed in efforts to forge a united Afro-descended community during the interwar years. The class will then explore Negritude and decolonization, ending with a modern exploration of Afro-Francophonie in France, the Caribbean, and Africa.

ECON 2101 - H01 (CRN#11566)

Student Data Mart - Gen Ed (Economics)

Hawkins Amato, Louis                          

Thursday 10:00 am - 11:15 am

Scope and methodology of economics as a social science, the measurement of national income, the theory of national income determination, money and banking, monetary and fiscal policy, and international economics.

Previous Course Listings

Curious about previous honors courses? The links below are to honors course listings from previous semesters. Some courses may be offered again in future semesters.