Course Descriptions

While many students have a notion that honors courses are, by default, harder, we always say that honors classes are different. With an average class size of just 17 students, honors classes allow students to have far more interaction with their professors and fellow students; in turn, this allows professors to design their classes to revolve around discussion and active learning rather than lectures and tests.

The Honors College offers two types of honors courses that are available to all honors students. Liberal Studies honors sections (LBST-H), which also fulfill general education requirements, and honors topics seminars (HONR 3700), upper-level discussion-intensive courses.

Please note, you must be enrolled in the University Honors Program, Business Honors Program, Levine Scholars Program, Crown Scholars Program, Martin Scholars Program, Art + Architecture Honors Program or have permission of the Honors College.  To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey (Office Administrator) at shannonzurell@uncc.edu.  

 

The following Honors College courses will be offered for the Spring 2021 semester: 

 

LBST 1102 – H71 (CRN#26724)        

Arts & Society: Film (HONR)

Moore, Abigail                                    

Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 – 11:15 (Hybrid – Synchronous)

Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College. To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu. “Noir Heroes: Dark and Dangerous Heroes in Popular Films” - Throughout our lives, we are constantly embarking on, making our way along, and coming to the end of journeys. Some journeys are inherent in the stages of our lives. Some journeys require us to climb mountains and slay dragons, either metaphorically or in reality. By examining the archetypal "hero’s journey", also known as the monomyth, we will examine common patterns of human behavior across time and around the world, not only in film, but in our own lives as well.

We’ll closely examine how Hollywood has defined and redefined what it means to be a hero and why, at certain times in our lives, we find comfort and strength from these characters. Finally, we’ll analyze the depiction of the dark hero in order to understand how and why these character types deviate from the archetypal hero.

 

LBST 1103 – H72 (CRN#26747)        

Arts & Society: Music (HONR)

Grymes, Jay                                         

Online Asynchronous

Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College. To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu. “Music, Culture, and Identity” - This course will examine a wide range of musical styles, including classical, world, and popular music, to investigate how music is perceived in cultural and historical contexts. We will explore how music expresses individual and group identities and, in turn, how music shapes cultural expectations of identity, including age, ethnicity, nationality, gender, sexual orientation, religion, and disability. To illustrate the various roles that music plays in teaching us about ourselves and the world in which we live, students will share and discuss music from their personal playlists with their classmates.

 

LBST 2301 – H79 (CRN#27499) Critical Thinking & Comm (HONR)

Tucker, Lindsey

Tuesday and Thursday 4:00 pm – 5:15 pm

Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert,Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College. To obtain permission pleasecontact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu A study of the concept of citizenship with an emphasis onscholarly understandings of the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Lectures, reading, and seminars explore thehistorical, ethical, and political foundations of voluntary service for issues such as poverty, homelessness, and socialjustice. Includes a service component that allows students to explore the relations of citizenship and public service.Students enrolled attend seminar meetings, complete 40 hours of service in the community and create a reflective journalassignment and final portfolio. All service opportunities will be planned in accordance with University guidance on public health and safety.

 

LBST 2101 – H74 (CRN#26768)        

Western History & Culture (HONR)

Stedman, Allison                                

Monday and Wednesday 4:00 pm – 5:15 pm (Online Synchronous)

Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College. To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu.  "Literature and Culture of France and Italy" - Taught in English, LBST 2101 is an introduction to the intersections of French and Italian literary production from the Middle Ages to the end of the nineteenth century. Designed as general survey, this course will focus primarily on how French and Italian literature engaged with similar cultural phenomena at different moments in their respective histories. For this reason, students will study the literary evolution of France and Italy while simultaneously familiarizing themselves with the historical contexts in which these and related artistic movements developed. By the end of the course, students should be able to see how literature engages with the cultural context that produced it, both mirroring this context and acting as a powerful agent of cultural change.

 

LBST 2102 – H75 (CRN#23872)        

Global Connections (HONR)

Lockton, Richard                                 

Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm (Hybrid – Asynchronous)

Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College. To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu. “From Sorcery to Science: Magic, Witchcraft, and the Scientific Revolution” - Between the late Middle Ages and the 18th century Age of Enlightenment, many dramatic changes occurred in the nature of European belief systems. During the course of what historians refer to as the “Scientific Revolution,” commonly held beliefs in such things as spells, ghosts, omens, astrology, and witchcraft increasingly gave way to new

scientific understandings about empirical “laws of nature.” This course will explore these changes in intellectual thought and popular belief, with a particular focus on the evolution of religion and ideas of Faith. Faith and religion are fundamental to the human experience, but this has meant vastly different things at different points in history. From faith in deities and supernatural forces, to faith in an intelligent designer of an ordered universe, faith is both a constant and constantly changing human characteristic.

 

LBST 2301 – H76 (CRN#23167)        

Critical Thinking & Comm (HONR)

Owens, Cache                                      

Tuesday 6:30 pm – 9:45 pm (Online Synchronous)

Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College. To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu A study of the concept of citizenship with an emphasis on scholarly understandings of the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Lectures, reading, and seminars explore the historical, ethical, and political foundations of voluntary service for issues such as poverty, homelessness, and social justice. Includes a service component that allows students to explore the relations of citizenship and public service. Students enrolled attend seminar meetings, complete 40 hours of service in the community and create a reflective journal assignment and final portfolio. All service opportunities will be planned in accordance with University guidance on public health and safety.

 

LBST 2301 – H77 (CRN#23188)        

Critical Thinking & Comm (HONR)

Howarth, Thomas “Joe”                   

Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 am – 9:45 am (Online Synchronous)

Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College. To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu A study of the concept of citizenship with an emphasis on scholarly understandings of the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Lectures, reading, and seminars explore the historical, ethical, and political foundations of voluntary service for issues such as poverty, homelessness, and social justice. Includes a service component that allows students to explore the relations of citizenship and public service. Students enrolled attend seminar meetings, complete 40 hours of service in the community and create a reflective journal assignment and final portfolio. All service opportunities will be planned in accordance with University guidance on public health and safety.

 

LBST 2301 – H78 (CRN#24638)        

Critical Thinking & Comm (HONR)

Adnot, Mindy                                      

Monday 2:30 pm – 5:15 pm

Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College. To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu A study of the concept of citizenship with an emphasis on scholarly understandings of the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Lectures, reading, and seminars explore the historical, ethical, and political foundations of voluntary service for issues such as poverty, homelessness, and social justice. Includes a service component that allows students to explore the relations of citizenship and public service. Students enrolled attend seminar meetings, complete 40 hours of service in the community and create a reflective journal assignment and final portfolio. All service opportunities will be planned in accordance with University guidance on public health and safety.

WRDS 2101-H Honors
Advanced Writing: Research and Critical Analysis (3 Credit Hours)
 
Dr. Meaghan Rand (Online Synchronous )
 
TR 10-11:15 am
 
Provides strategies for writing in academic majors, across majors, and beyond graduation into professions and / or  graduate school. The focus is on how to transfer academic writing to students' chosen profession or field. Students build on their current knowledge, acquiring advanced research practices; engaging in critical analysis of professional materials in their field; learning to use grammar, mechanics, and textual conventions for appropriate media; and understanding and supporting arguments and claims with credible evidence

 

HONR 3700 – H01 (CRN#22170)     

Honors College Topics: Sacrifices Onstage, Onscreen, and Between Brains

Pizzato, Mark                                      

Tuesday and Thursday 4:00 pm – 5:15 pm (Online Synchronous)

Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College. To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu. Which sacrifices do we each make in our daily lives, restricting immediate pleasures for long-term rewards? How do such personal restrictions, demanded by the moral, social, and perhaps religious framework that gives meaning to our identities, sometimes backfire, evoking rebellion against authorities or conflicts between groups, even to the point of violence? This course explores the tragic aspects of sacrificial violence, ideological projections, and scapegoating, in plays of past periods and fiThanlms of recent decades.

 

HONR 3700 – H02 (CRN#22169)     

Honors College Topics: Reading in Slow Motion

Pereira, Malin                                      

Friday 2:30 pm – 5:15 pm (Hybrid – Synchronous)

Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College. To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu. This course is based on an unusual course design (thanks, Richard E. Miller!) that intends to build lifelong deep-reading and thinking habits. You can learn more about it on blogs and faculty/student websites, such as http://text2cloud.com/wp- content/uploads/2011/01/Reading_in_Slow_Motion_Final-41.pdf.

 

There are five rules for the course:

  1. There is only one book assigned (for us, a 2018 collection of essays by Zadie Smith, Feel Free, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism);
  2. The course meets once a week in a 3-hour time period (approximately);
  3. Each week, the assigned reading is about 10-15 pages (before you get too excited, that means you will be expected to read deeply, plus, see #4 parenthetical aside, below);
  4. Use of technology is not allowed in the classroom (but is expected outside the classroom in order to perform inquiry into ideas/issues presented in the reading);
  5. The final research paper (15-20 pages) may be on anything except the assigned text. This will be a course driven by student interests prompted by the essays and by student inquiry (research), thinking, writing, and discussion about where this leads you.

 

HONR 3700 – H03 (CRN#23693)     

Honors College Topics: SEX, DRUGS, AND ROCK ‘N’ ROLL: Means toward the Religious Experience across Time and Space

McDaniel, Janet                                  

Monday and Wednesday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm (Online Synchronous)

Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College. To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu What became known in the 1960s and ‘70s as “sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll,” though distinctive in expression, was not unique. Alluded to disparagingly a century earlier as “wine, women, and song,” the combination was seen quite differently by the ancients, who spoke of them in terms of divinities

— Aphrodite, Dionysus, and Apollo — and indeed employed them as means to access direct religious experiences; that is, as techniques of ecstasy or of transcending the personality. There are renewed interests nowadays in “peak experiences” and “flow” in ostensibly secular fields such as sports or the arts, as well as in those experiences brought about through traditional forms of meditation. Likewise, there has always been some degree of cultural acceptance for so-called spontaneous religious experiences. But much less consideration and acceptance are afforded to music, drugs, and sex as valid and effective means of accessing these experiences. In this course we will examine ways in which Aphrodite, Dionysus, and Apollo — whatever their masks — were worshiped in various cultures and subcultures, examining by the way ancient and modern attitudes and reactions to these techniques and the experiences they produced. We will begin by focusing on “old-world” and “new-world” cultures up until the Enlightenment then set out to examine the various

“rediscoveries” of these technologies in the modern period and their utilization down to our own time.

 

HONR 3700 – H04 (CRN#27294)     

Honors College Topics: From Intersectionality to Misogynoir: The Literary Origins of Black Feminist Thought

Benjamin, Shanna                              

Tuesday 2:30 pm – 5:15 pm (Online Synchronous)

Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College. To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu. Individuals active on social media invoke a range of terms— intersectionality, misogynoir, and #metoo, for example—often with little knowledge of the Black feminist origins of these terms. Black Twitter responds with correctives and contemporary research does, too, (see Feminista Jones’ Reclaiming Our Space: How Black Feminists Are Changing the World from the Tweets to the Streets (2019)), but there is nothing quite like returning to the source and engaging, first hand, with the movies and books, letters and personalities, newspaper articles and scholarly essays that combined to form the uniquely Black feminist foundation on which these movements

stand. “From Intersectionality to Misogynoir: The Literary Origins of Black Feminist Thought” travels back in time to read the books that marked the beginning of what we now know as Black feminist thought. The early, formative work of writers and scholars like Toni Cade, Barbara Smith, Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Mary Helen Washington, Nellie Y. McKay, Barbara T. Christian, Ann duCille and others changed the game. Unfortunately, both then and now, the intellectual labor of Black women thinkers is subject to erasure, used as “raw material” for the intellectual pursuits of others. Join me as we reclaim books like Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937), Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye (1970), and Alice Walker’s The Color Purple (1982) to better understand how Black women’s narrative theorizing remains indispensable to critical thought in the ivory tower and the public sphere as well.

 

HONR 3700 – H05 (CRN#26792)     

Honors College Topics: Workplace Diversity in a Global Society

Simpson, Denise                                 

Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 am – 11:15 am (Online Synchronous)

Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College. To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu. Workforce diversity can provide organizations with access to a broad talent pool, drive business growth by marketing to minority communities, and generate good will from customers and investors by enhancing corporate image. What does it mean for the workplace environment when management practices value and promote diversity and inclusion? On the other hand, what are the implications when management practices do not value diversity and inclusion? As globalization continues to transform society, what does this mean for a diverse workplace? This course will use social and psychological theories to examine the inclusion and exclusion experiences of people in the workplace as we move towards a globalized society. We will use current businesses and industries to examine new ways of thinking about diversity and inclusion initiatives from a global perspective. The course will also build on and expand content in social policy, human behavior theories, communication, and workplaces practices on the macro, mezzo, and macro levels. Students will be required to go outside the classroom to research a business or organization in accordance with the Inclusive Workplace Model and present their findings in a collaborative final group project.

 

HONR 3700 – H06 (CRN#26795)    

Honors College Topics: Who Really Conquered the Aztec Empire?

Ferdinando, Peter                              

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 8:00 am – 8:50 am (Online Synchronous)

Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College. To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu. This course examines the 1519-1521 conquest of the Aztec Empire by Hernán Cortés, several hundred additional Spaniards, and tens of thousands to possibly hundreds of thousands of their indigenous allies. This conquest was a crucial turning point in the history of the Americas, leading to the Spanish colonization of much of the continent and the extraction of innumerous wealth and labor. Yet, the so-called Spanish Conquest of Mexico—the very origins of Latin America—largely was an indigenous affair. This course asks several questions about this conquest. Why would so many Native American peoples revolt against the indigenous Mexica rulers of the Aztec Empire and ally with the European strangers? Why do many historical retellings of this event erase such a numerically dominant indigenous force? Ultimately, through readings, discussions, presentations, and papers we will

tackle this course’s core question of who really conquered the Aztec Empire?

 

ECON 2102 – H01 (CRN#21341)      

Principles of Economics

Amato, Ted                                          

Tuesday and Thursday (Online Asynchronous)

Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College. To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu.  Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing. Pricing mechanism of a market economy, the industrial organization of the U.S. economy, problems of economic concentration, the theory of income distribution, and comparative economic systems. Honors section includes a group project in which team members complete a term assignment covering a microeconomic issue.

 

WRDS 2101-H Honors Advanced Writing: Research and Critical Analysis
 
(Dr. Meaghan Rand)
 
Online Synchronous TR 10-11:15 am
 
Provides strategies for writing in academic majors, across majors, and beyond graduation into professions and / or  graduate school. The focus is on how to transfer academic writing to students' chosen profession or field. Students build on their current knowledge, acquiring advanced research practices; engaging in critical analysis of professional materials in their field; learning to use grammar, mechanics, and textual conventions for appropriate media; and understanding and supporting arguments and claims with credible evidence.

The following UHP courses will be offered for the Spring 2021 semester: 

 

HONR 3791 – H90 (CRN#21468)    

 Senior University Honors Program Project Adnot, Mindy                                      

Monday 5:30 pm – 8:15 pm

Must be enrolled in the University Honors Program. The Senior University Honors Program project is directed by an honors faculty committee selected by the student. This course provides the opportunity for writing workshops, group discussions, and feedback. The course is offered only in the Spring semester for students planning to graduate the same semester or in the following Fall semester.

 

 

 

Previous Course Listings

Curious about previous honors courses? The links below are to honors course listings from previous semesters. Some courses may be offered again in future semesters.